Indian History Part 73 The Sangama Dynasty Section V: Dynastic Greatness

Canberra, 19 May 2019 The order of succession on the demise of Deva Raya I is a bit confused. Different inscriptions provide perplexing evidence of two sons of Deva Raya I—Ramachandra and Vijaya—as well as a grandson Deva Raya II as ruling at the same time. Although this conflicting information has been gathered from inscriptions […]

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Indian History Part 73 The Sangama Dynasty, Section IV: Altering the Balance of Power

Canberra, 18 May 2019  Harihara Raya II had five grown up sons, at least three of whom were powerful governors and also ambitious. On his death, the succession was violently disputed by these three princes. This was a scenario that Harihara II had wanted to avoid, but the succession struggle continued for nearly two years […]

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Indian History Part 73 The Sangama Dynasty Section III: Stabilisation: Vira Harihara Raya II

Canberra, 27 April 2019 Harihara, son of Bukka with his queen Gourambika, came to the throne on his father’s death while the kingdom was still at war. There are no records of any dispute regarding the succession with few inscriptions emphasising this point. It can be taken for granted that there were no internal dissentions […]

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Indian History Part 73 The Sangama Dynasty Section II: Territorial expansion Under Bukka Raya I

Canberra, 19 April 2019 Bukka was the ablest and best of the Sangama brothers and had been associated with the founding of the kingdom with his eldest brother from the very beginning. Harihara left no surviving son and had nominated Bukka as the ‘Yuvaraja’, or crown prince, in 1337 itself. Further, he had already performed […]

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Indian History Part 73 The Sangama Dynasty Section I: An Astute Beginning

Canberra, 13 April 2019 Sangama was a relatively obscure person, said to be the son of one Bukka. Some have identified this Bukka as a minor noble Bukkarayulu, which could also mean that he was a Reddy chief. However, this information cannot be corroborated with any other available source. Sangama was Bhava Sangama a valiant […]

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Indian History Part 72 Disputed Origins: The Continuing Debate

Canberra, 16 March 2019  The first reality that is noticeable regarding the great Vijayanagar Empire is that unlike many other famous, and infamous kingdoms, it is named after a city with the title ‘Empire’ added to it. It is opined that calling this great Hindu empire, unquestionably the greatest in medieval India, by the name […]

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Indian History Part 71 South India – 14th Century Section II: Uprisings, Revolts and Rebellions

Canberra, 10 March 2019 By the end of the 13th century, Southern India—Deccan and the Deep South—was characterised by Hindu religious progress. However, the Peninsula remained politically divided although the major kingdoms were in decline, thereby becoming vulnerable to the Islamic invasion that had started to become an unabated flood from the north. Succeeding rulers […]

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Indian History Part 71 South India – 14th Century Section I: Islamic Rule Permeates the Deccan

Canberra, 1 March 2019 The establishment of the Delhi Sultanate altered the character of North India irrevocably. However, this event did not have any direct impact on the lands to the south of River Narmada and the Vindhya Mountain ranges that could be called, in a very generic manner, Peninsular or Southern India. The historical […]

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Indian History Part 69 The Deccan Shahis – Other Aspects Section II: The Cultural Front

Corbett National Park, Uttarakhand 6 January 2019 The Deccan Shahi kings were generally great patrons of art and literature and some of the kings were poets and litterateurs of some repute. This patronage was particularly demonstrated in Golconda under the Qutb Shahis who assiduously cultivated the arts. Languages Medieval Deccan saw the development of a […]

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Indian History Part 69 Deccan Shahis – Other Aspects Sect I: Administration, Military and Foreign Affairs

Singapore, 29 December 2019 The Deccan was ruled for more than three centuries by Muslim kings, starting with the Bahmanis in early to mid-1300s during their highly centralised independent rule and continuing even after the splintering of the Bahmani kingdom into the five successor states—of these, Bijapur, Ahmadnagar and Golconda were the more prominent. Even […]

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