Tag Archives: Deccan

Indian History Part 84 Aurangzeb Section VII: The Curtain Falls

Canberra, 23 February 2021 After the capture and execution of Shambhuji, it would have been logical for Aurangzeb to return to Delhi—the three major powers in the Deccan, the Adil and the Qutb Shahis and the Marathas, had been effectively destroyed or subdued and their territories annexed to the Empire. There was nothing more to […]

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Indian History Part 84 Aurangzeb Section VI: The Last Foray into the Deccan

Canberra, 23 February 2021 On 8th September 1681 Aurangzeb, 63 years old and having been on the throne for 23 years, made a hasty peace with Mewar and set out from Ajmer for the Deccan, reaching Burhanpur on 13th November 1681. This was the culmination of a sequence of events in Rajputana, most of which […]

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Indian History Part 84 Aurangzeb Section IV: Emergence of the Marathas

Canberra, 6 February 2021 Geography and nature had never intended the Deccan Plateau to be an integral part of the greater Indian sub-continent. The Vindhya and Satpura Mountain Ranges and the River Narmada form a triple barricade that divides the high tableland of Central India from the Gangetic Plains. These formidable geographical barriers should have […]

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Indian History Part 84 Aurangzeb Section II Alienation of the Hindus 1. The Jat Rebellion

Canberra, 20 January 2021 BACKGROUND Aurangzeb had won the Mughal throne as the champion of Sunni Muslim orthodoxy against the liberal-minded Dara, who had claimed the mantle of religious tolerance of his predecessors. On being defeated, Dara had been tried and convicted of being a heretic and subsequently executed, or more correctly, murdered. In the […]

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Indian History Part 82 Jahangir Section III: Intrigue, A Coup and the Death of an Emperor

Canberra, 02 November 2020 Shah Jahan was humiliated at the abject failure of his revolt and Nur Jahan overjoyed at having come out the ‘victor’ in the power struggle. However, the wheels of fortune were continuing to rotate and Mahabat Khan emerged as the most powerful noble, having been instrumental in crushing Shah Jahan’s rebellion. […]

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Indian History Part 82 Jahangir Section II: A Queen Rules and a Prince Rebels

Canberra, 02 November 2020 After successfully subjugating his eldest son Prince Khusrau’s rebellion and imprisoning him, Jahangir turned to consider ways to consolidate his power over the vast Empire that he had inherited. His son’s rebellion had made Jahangir inherently insecure; he had started to distrust his own strength and judgement, and he was apprehensive […]

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Indian History Part 75 The Tuluva Dynasty Section V: Krishna Deva Raya – King, Warrior, Satesman

Canberra, 15 September 2019 Krishna Deva Raya is reported to have been endowed with a firm belief in following high ideals of honour and duty from an early age. Further, he was carefully groomed by the gifted and sagacious Prime Minster Timmaraya about the duties and responsibilities of a king during the early years of […]

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Indian History Part 67 The Nizam Shahis of Ahmadnagar Section V: Stagnation and Confusion – Murtaza’s Last Days

Canberra, 15 September 2018 Shah Haidar had been installed as the Peshwa, helped with the influence of Asad Khan who was an honoured and influential noble of the realm. However, Haidar repaid the good-will by banishing Asad to Daulatabad. Further, Haidar ignored the advice that Murtaza had given him on his appointment and started to […]

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Indian History Part 62 The Deccan – A Broad Overview

Canberra, 3 February 2018    The Deccan Plateau forms part of the Indian Peninsula bounded by the Vindhya Mountain Ranges and the River Godavari to the north and the Rivers Tungabhadra and Krishna to the south. The Eastern and Western Ghats, mountain ranges that skirt the sea coast on both sides of the peninsula serve […]

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Indian History Part 56 The Tughluq Dynasty Section III Muhammad Tughluq: Revolts, Rebellions and Military Expeditions

  Canberra, 28 May 2017 The entire reign of Muhammad Tughluq was plagued by rebellions and revolts in different parts of the kingdom, even though he had ascended the throne without any contest. Very early in his rule, his own nephew Baha ud-Din Gurshasp who held the fief of Sagar near Gulbarga in the Deccan, […]

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