Indian History Part 64 South India Section II: Prologue to Hindu Revival

Canberra, 4 March 2018    As in any number of cases in history before and after, there was an interim period of uncertainty and confusion following the overthrow of the Khilji dynasty by the Tughluqs. No doubt, the Tughluqs went on to establish one of the more significant dynasties of the Delhi Sultanate and also […]

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Indian History Part 64 South India Section I: A Tale of Three Kingdoms

Canberra, 21 February 2018   The once-great Chalukya Empire vanished at the end of 12th century, disintegrating into unrecognisable sub-states; and by early 13th century, the other great dynasty, the Cholas, were in terminal decline in a free fall. For the next century, the Deccan was dominated by the Yadavas in Devagiri and the Kakatiyas […]

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Indian History Part 63: The Bridge Between Two Eras

Canberra, 16 February 2018 The geo-cultural axis, forged along the ancient trade routes that wound its way east through the Khyber and Bolan Passes, gradually became migratory corridors into North India. Subsequently they linked South Asia and the Iranian plateau by joining Lahore to Delhi. At Delhi the migratory route trifurcated—one led directly south to […]

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Indian History Part 62 The Deccan – A Broad Overview

Canberra, 3 February 2018    The Deccan Plateau forms part of the Indian Peninsula bounded by the Vindhya Mountain Ranges and the River Godavari to the north and the Rivers Tungabhadra and Krishna to the south. The Eastern and Western Ghats, mountain ranges that skirt the sea coast on both sides of the peninsula serve […]

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Indian History Part 61 The Dance of Religions; Section IV The Medieval Hindu Revival

Udaipur, India 2 January 2017  REFORM THROUGH BHAKTI At the time when the Islamic conquest of the sub-continent began in earnest, Hindu Brahmanism was fully established in India. All religious questioning and competition that had been posed by Buddhism and Jainism had been comprehensively removed. The most important socio-cultural event of the 14th and 15th […]

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Indian History Part 61 Section III: The Mingling Mysticism

Mumbai, 18 December 2017   In early 14th century the religious make up of India was gradually altering. Buddhism had almost vanished from the land of its birth; Jainism was confined to a narrow area in the west of the sub-continent; and Islam was in its infancy, spread across scattered settlements in North India and […]

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Indian History Part 61 Section II: Sufism in India During the Sultanate

Canberra, 15 December 2017   It may not be incorrect to state that a large number of Muslims, perhaps even the majority, have very limited understanding of the theological underpinnings of their faith. This reality was as true in medieval times as it is now, not only in the Indian sub-continent but also across all […]

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Indian History Part 61 The Dance of the Religions Section I: The Assiduous Power of Hinduism

Canberra, 10 December 2017   From the earliest times, Indian civilisation has flourished within the confines of a great social and religious system called Hinduism. Although Hinduism is now equated to a religion, it has always been, and continues to be, a system as old and unique as the civilisation that it nurtured. The initiation, […]

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Indian History Part 60 Section II The Caliphate and the Sultanate – Debating the Relationship

Canberra, 5 December 2014   The status of Delhi Sultanate vis-à-vis the Caliphate in Baghdad and the relationship that existed between the two continues to be open to a number of interpretations. Some of these interpretations are provided by few well-known historians, but with superficial proof and therefore do not stand the test of investigation. […]

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Indian History Part 60 The Encroaching Islamic Influence Section I Governance of the Sulatanate

Canberra, 24 November 2017 From its very beginning, the Delhi Sultanate was governed in accordance with the Islamic Law, as laid down in the Sharia. Even though there were few exceptions to the strict adherence to the laid down norms, successive Sultans largely followed the injunctions of the Sharia in the administration of their kingdom. […]

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