Tag Archives: Peninsular India

FROM INDUS TO INDEPENDENCE: A TREK THROUGH INDIAN HISTORY: Part 15

Canberra, 18 August 2013 A MAURYAN INTERLUDE IN THE PENINSULA In 4th century B.C. the Nandas of Pataliputra expanded the borders of their Magadhan kingdom towards the south, although the exact limit of their move south is not known. It is certain that Kalinga was conquered, confirmed by the famous Hathigumpha inscriptions of Kharavela who […]

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FROM INDUS TO INDEPENDENCE: A TREK THROUGH INDIAN HISTORY Part 14

Canberra, 11 August 2013 SHARDS OF LIGHT IN PENINSULAR HISTORY Section II THE IMPERCEPTIBLE ARYANISATION The process of ‘aryanisation’ of the Indian sub-continent has been discussed and debated since Indian history became a subject of serious study. There have been a number of theories that have been put forward, most based on the analysis of […]

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FROM INDUS TO INDEPENDENCE: A TREK THROUGH INDIAN HISTORY: Part 14

Canberra, 30 July 2013 SHARDS OF LIGHT IN PENINSULAR HISTORY Section I THE AGASTYA CONNECTION The history of Peninsular India starts to take recognisable shape only with the chronicling of the southern movement of the ‘Aryans’ from the north. This is indicated in literature, both of the south and the north, and through legends that […]

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FROM INDUS TO INDEPENDENCE: A TREK THROUGH INDIAN HISTORY: Part 12

Canberra, 30 May 2013 PENINSULAR INDIA: OF MOUNTAINS AND RIVERS [GOING SOUTH OF THE VINDHYAS: AN EXPLANATION Even a cursory glance at the available literature on Indian history reveals that there is an absolute bias towards recounting the history of the northern part of the sub-continent, specifically that of the Indus-Gangetic plains, and labelling it […]

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