Tag Archives: Robert Sewell

Indian History Part 76 Collapse of an Empire Section IV Recouping the Kingdom after the Defeat

Canberra, 30 November 2019 Robert Sewell, the celebrated historian, states categorically that the history of Vijayanagara finishes with the defeat at the Battle of Rakshasa-Tangadi [Talikota] since the Empire disintegrated, rapidly decayed and became extinct soon after the battle. This assessment is based completely on the reports of Ferishta, written around 1612-14. Ferishta, one of […]

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Indian History Part 76 Collapse of an Empire Section II: The Aftermath

Canberra, 27 November 2019 The four Shahi kings moved from the battlefield towards Vijayanagara and halted at Anegundi. They send out advance parties of soldiers to prepare the capital for a great triumphal entry of the victors. After a few days they entered the capital in a state procession with the four kings at the […]

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Indian History Part 75 The Tuluva Dynasty Section V: Krishna Deva Raya – King, Warrior, Satesman

Canberra, 15 September 2019 Krishna Deva Raya is reported to have been endowed with a firm belief in following high ideals of honour and duty from an early age. Further, he was carefully groomed by the gifted and sagacious Prime Minster Timmaraya about the duties and responsibilities of a king during the early years of […]

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Indian History Part 73 The Sangama Dynasty Section VII Vijayanagara

Canberra, 23 June 2019 VIJAYANAGARA – THE CITY OF VICTORY AT THE HEIGHT OF SANGAMA POWER Often the name of the capital, which forms the principal seat of government, is given to the whole empire or kingdom that it controls. The Roman Empire and the Vijayanagara Empire both fall into this category. The Chalukya scion […]

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Indian History Part 73 The Sangama Dynasty Section V: Dynastic Greatness

Canberra, 19 May 2019 The order of succession on the demise of Deva Raya I is a bit confused. Different inscriptions provide perplexing evidence of two sons of Deva Raya I—Ramachandra and Vijaya—as well as a grandson Deva Raya II as ruling at the same time. Although this conflicting information has been gathered from inscriptions […]

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