Tag Archives: Nizam Shahi dynasty

The Marathas Part 4 Shahji Bhonsle Section I: Entrenching Maratha Power

Canberra, 2 June 2021 Till the last few years of Malik Ambar’s defiance of Mughal invasion into the Deccan, the Muslim chronicles hardly mention the local Maratha chieftains and soldiers fighting against them. However, by about 1625, the loyalty of the Maratha chiefs was sufficiently important for the Nizam Shah to surreptitiously have Lakhoji Jadhav […]

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The Marathas Part 3 – The Rise of the Bhonsle Clan

Canberra, 30 May 2021 Even after the break-up of the Bahmani Sultanate, the general circumstances of the Marathas remained unaltered. A majority of the hill forts were garrisoned by Maratha chiefs—some in the service of one or the other Shahi kingdom and a lesser number by semi-independent Deshmukhs. By this time Muslim ranks—mansabs, depending on […]

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The Marathas Part 2: Framing the Maratha Identity

Canberra, 21 May 2021 By late 13th century, the Hindu revolt in Peninsular India against the invading Muslim forces was bitter and widespread. Even the learned heads of various Hindu ‘Maths’, monasteries, were involved in attempting to repel the Muslim invaders. Shankaracharya Madhav Vidyaranya, the head of the famous and powerful Sringeri Math, was one […]

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Indian History Part 84 Aurangzeb Section IV: Emergence of the Marathas

Canberra, 6 February 2021 Geography and nature had never intended the Deccan Plateau to be an integral part of the greater Indian sub-continent. The Vindhya and Satpura Mountain Ranges and the River Narmada form a triple barricade that divides the high tableland of Central India from the Gangetic Plains. These formidable geographical barriers should have […]

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Indian History Part 83 Shah Jahan Section III: The Deccan Campaign

Canberra, 30 November 2020 Prior to Shah Jahan’s accession, Mughal interest in the Deccan had waxed and waned in direct proportion to the stability and turmoil in North India. Akbar had started a concerted effort to bring the Deccan under the Mughal flag and in 1569 had conquered Khandesh. By 1600, parts of Berar had […]

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Indian History Part 83 Shah Jahan Section I: Early Years

Canberra, 11 November 2020 Although it was common knowledge that Emperor Jahangir had been gravely ill for some time and the possibility of his death was very real, the actual event on his way back from Kashmir came as a great blow to Nur Jahan. Her absolute hold on power and personal enthusiasm had emanated […]

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Indian History Part 81 Akbar Sect IV The Conquering Emperor 6. The North-West and the Deccan

Canberra, 22 August 2020 Even when the rebellion in Bengal was raging without an end in sight, and it was thought that the East would be lost to the Empire, Akbar did not march to Bengal. Though all his military instincts—which were highly developed—prompted him to rush to the East, he held back, for the […]

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Indian History Part 77 The Aravidu Dynasty Section III: Venkata Deva Raya II

Canberra, 26 December 2019 Sri Ranga Deva’s younger brother, Rama Raja, had predeceased him, leaving behind two sons. However, at the time of Sri Ranga’s death, both these princes were minors. Therefore, the ‘people’, meaning the nobles, Brahmins and warriors, chose Venkata the youngest brother of Sri Ranga, to succeed to the throne. This move […]

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Indian History Part 76 Collapse of an Empire Section III Rama Raya – A Retrospective Analysis

Canberra, 30 November 2019 In a purely factual analysis of the decline of the Vijayanagara Empire, Rama Raya’s name stands out either as a hero or a villain depending on the bias of the author or researcher. It is an indisputable fact that Rama Raya was the de facto king of the Empire at the […]

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