Tag Archives: Deccan Plateau

Indian History Part 84 Aurangzeb Section VII: The Curtain Falls

Canberra, 23 February 2021 After the capture and execution of Shambhuji, it would have been logical for Aurangzeb to return to Delhi—the three major powers in the Deccan, the Adil and the Qutb Shahis and the Marathas, had been effectively destroyed or subdued and their territories annexed to the Empire. There was nothing more to […]

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Indian History Part 84 Aurangzeb Section IV: Emergence of the Marathas

Canberra, 6 February 2021 Geography and nature had never intended the Deccan Plateau to be an integral part of the greater Indian sub-continent. The Vindhya and Satpura Mountain Ranges and the River Narmada form a triple barricade that divides the high tableland of Central India from the Gangetic Plains. These formidable geographical barriers should have […]

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Indian History Part 66 The Adil Shahis of Bijapur, Section VI: A Concluding Evaluation

Canberra, 7 July 2018   The Adil Shahi kingdom of Bijapur was centred on modern Bijapur district in Karnataka, in the western region of the Deccan Plateau. Earlier it had been a province of the more extensive Bahmani kingdom. The Bijapur kingdom was established in 1489 and ceased to exist as an independent entity on […]

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Indian History Part 63: The Bridge Between Two Eras

Canberra, 16 February 2018 The geo-cultural axis, forged along the ancient trade routes that wound its way east through the Khyber and Bolan Passes, gradually became migratory corridors into North India. Subsequently they linked South Asia and the Iranian plateau by joining Lahore to Delhi. At Delhi the migratory route trifurcated—one led directly south to […]

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FROM INDUS TO INDEPENDENCE: A TREK THROUGH INDIAN HISTORY: Part 12

Canberra, 30 May 2013 PENINSULAR INDIA: OF MOUNTAINS AND RIVERS [GOING SOUTH OF THE VINDHYAS: AN EXPLANATION Even a cursory glance at the available literature on Indian history reveals that there is an absolute bias towards recounting the history of the northern part of the sub-continent, specifically that of the Indus-Gangetic plains, and labelling it […]

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